Cooking With My Brother

Cooking With My Brother

The plain and smiple truth is that I’m not much for cooking. I certainly can do the basics, things like pastas, grilled cheese and even hard boiled eggs (with a little assistance from Google). But, I have always had a part of me that wanted to do more in the kitchen.

I think part of that reason is that my brother loved to cook. He was in every way, a fantastic, passionate cook. He loved everything about it and his home was full of cookbooks and Saveur magazines that helped feed his passion. I have many memories of him, as a young teenager, getting up early and helping Granny make her buttermilk biscuits and red-eye gravy when we visited her. As an adult, he loved re-creating our Granny’s buttermilk biscuits as a way of staying connected to his past.

This afternoon, as my wife was preparing our Thanksgiving feast, I decided to jump in and help where she would let me. She put me on pie crust duty for the mini-pies we were making. As I sprinkled the flour on the counter and began rolling out the crust, I looked at my hands. I could not help but think about how often Ben must have done the same things with his hands. They would have had flour or some seasoning or another on them and that would have been a happy place for him. And there it was, a brief moment of connection, of understanding, of love.

I will never be the cook he was but I am going to keep trying. I loved feeling him with me there, in that moment.

Dancing in the Minefields

Dancing in the Minefields

This has been a tough year for me, one of my hardest in fact. Losing my brother so suddenly has sent me reeling in ways that I could not plan for or anticipate. Grief is a strange thing in that way. As I am climbing out of the depths, I have decided to spend more time actively focusing on the best things in my life, both big and small.

To start out, I thought I would go with a super big thing and write a small thing about my wife and our partnership. You see, our marriage has been full of minefields, storms, chaos and shadows. But all that has seemed like nothing to fear, because i have her.
As we approach our 15th wedding anniversary, I am struck for the millionth time how perfect she is for me, and thus, how perfect our partnership is. I do not use the word “perfect” in the sense that she or our marriage are without fault, because that would not be true. But, for me and what fuels my heart and soul, she truly is perfect. There is this song by Andrew Peterson that i have heard many times called “Dancing in the Minefields.” Tears stream down my face every single time I hear it because of how the lyrics reflect my heart for her. Here are a few of the verses:
Well, “I do” are the two most famous last words The beginning of the end But to lose your life for another I’ve heard Is a good place to begin ‘Cause the only way to find your life is to lay your own life down And I believe it’s an easy price For the life that we have found And we’re dancing in the minefields We’re sailing in the storms And this is harder than we dreamed But I believe that’s what the promise is for So when I lose my way, find me And when I loose love’s chains, bind me At the end of all my faith, till the end of all my days When I forget my name, remind me ‘Cause we bear the light of the Son of Man So there’s nothing left to fear So I’ll walk with you in the shadowlands Till the shadows disappear ‘Cause He promised not to leave us And His promises are true So in the face of all this chaos, baby, I can dance with you So let’s go dancing in the minefields Let’s go sailing in the storms Oh, let’s go dancing in the minefields And kickin’ down the doors Oh, let’s go dancing in the minefields And sailing in the storms Oh, this is harder than we dreamed but I believe that’s what the promise is for
So, through all the loss, the doctor’s appointments, the financial struggles, the daily frustrations and madness, there has also been so much wonderful. Being with you is the easiest thing I have ever done because you chase away my shadows and we just dance. Forever and ever, amen.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Gs3fg_WsEg
I Thought We Had More Time

I Thought We Had More Time

“I thought we had more time.”

I can’t shake this phrase today in thinking about my brother. As adults, we were not as close as we would have preferred. Living so far apart made that difficult but, I thought we had more time to grow close once again. We were as different as brothers could be. I’m tall, he wasn’t. He was an artistic creative soul, I am more logical. I have a beard, he struggled to get a soul patch going. My favorite hobbies are indoor things, his were mostly outdoors. But in all of these things, we still had so much in common and I thought we had more time to explore those things.

I thought we had more time. Those 6 words will haunt me as they will many others who were in his life. But we don’t, and I don’t. All I can do now, is wrestle with this beast that I’m so unfamiliar with and learn. Learn what losing Ben will teach me. To love much more intentionally. To live more free. To create without fear. To be humble and honest about my failings. To see beauty in all of God’s creation. You see, all these are areas he excelled in and so he still inspires me, as a big brother should.

Brother Ben

Bear with me as I may use this forum to share some of my grief but also to look forward.

Best In Show

Best In Show

Peanut began to show an interest in art when she was seven or eight years old. She started by tracing line art drawings that we would print out for her. She then progressed to doing more and more complex art of her own, mostly using pencils, pens and markers. As she matured as an artist, she began working with paints, pastels, charcoal, mixed media nod even a little bit of sculpting has been thrown in for good measure. As parents who are not artistic ourselves, we have just stepped back and watched in wonder as she has continued down this path. This type of pursuit of an interest is precisely why we chose to homeschool in the first place and we have provided her with the space and time to go where it will lead her.

And so here we are, six years into the “hobby” and I don’t think we can still call it a hobby any longer. She “arts” every single day and continues to push herself to try new techniques, methods and styles. Will this lead to a high paying career one day? I don’t know and I don’t really care at this point. Because what art and her pursuit of it has done is teach her to be disciplined, to be courageous and to put herself out there in ways that we never envisioned.

She has been a part of a homeschool art studio for about a year now and they submitted pieces to be judged as part of the 40th Annual Lubbock Arts Festival. They were competing with more than 50 local area elementary, middle and high schools and as a group, they took home three Honorable Mentions and one Best in Show. That Best in Show award went to our Peanut. She submitted a painting that she did in acrylic paint called :A Deer in a Forest.”

We are ecstatic for her. Her piece was one of the few paintings that was submitted and that really helped her stand out among all the other artists. She showed courage to work in suck an unforgiving medium and to put it out there to be judged. Those things are not easy for eighth grade girls and we couldn’t be more proud of her.

Library Time

Library Time

A love of reading is one of those things that we as parents desperately want to impart to our kids. Whether we have achieved that is still a work in progress. However, pictures like these, of our seven year-old G man at the library seem to have us at least pointed in the right direction. Now, I’ am debating on whether I should warn him about those crocodiles (or are they alligators?) chomping on his feet. Oh well, at least he’ll go down reading.

This Kid Is A Storyteller

This Kid Is A Storyteller

[dropcap]I[/dropcap]n every family with multiple kids, there has to be at least one. You know who I am talking about. The one that craves the attention. The one that can look mom straight in the eyes and tell a fib. The boy who cried wolf. The one that’s a storyteller.

We certainly have one of those. In our family, the storyteller is Gideon. He is seven years old, has super cute dimples and also has practically zero impulse control. Let’s just say, he’s a hot mess and a work in progress. He challenges us daily as parents and frankly, sometimes we just want to dropkick the kid. He really should come with a warning label and this was never more clear than a few weeks back, after dropping him off at Sunday School. You see, we should have warned the teacher of his stories and his uncanny ability to make you believe every word that comes out of his mouth. But we didn’t, and the results were hilarious.

I was waiting in the crowded hallway outside the kids’ classrooms. waiting for Andi to pick up the boys. Out she comes, laughing while Gideon is following close behind with a sheepish look on face. I thought nothing of it since that is pretty much his default face when we are out in public. Then come his teachers and they  looked at me and said, “Oh, you are looking good for someone who died two days ago.” Um. Thanks?

What in the world did they mean by that? Well, apparently our storyteller wove a real doozy for them. At the end of class, they asked the kids if they had anything that they needed to be prayed for and when nobody spoke up, Gideon raised his hand. He proceeds to tell them that his dad had died two days earlier of cancer and that he would appreciate their prayers. So, being good Sunday School teachers and also good human beings, they surrounded him with the other kids and they all prayed for him in his time of great loss. Fortunately for him, dad was standing right outside in the hallway, waiting for him to come out of class.

As was said so eloquently in Monty Python and the Holy Grail, “I’m not dead yet.” This was definitely a story to remember but it was just one of many from our storyteller.

Ungeniused Makes Me Slightly More Geniused

Ungeniused Makes Me Slightly More Geniused

In my ongoing series of articles about great podcasts, I’d like to take a moment and write about Ungeniused. This twice-monthly podcast is pretty short in length, about 12-15 minutes per episode and is all about the weirdest articles found on Wikipedia.  It is hosted by Stephen Hackett and Myke Hurley, the co-founders of Relay FM, which is one of my favorite podcast networks with numerous great shows.

Ungeniused is a great show for those that like odd and strange bits of information and the hosts work wonderfully together. They are clearly good friends off-air and this shows through in their easy banter. Each episode focuses on one article that they choose beforehand and then they simply talk about the things that they find interesting about it. It is very easy to listen to, is quite family friendly in my experience and I think kids 10 and up would find it quite engaging. It would be a great fit for driving in the car or even to break up a homeschooling day with the kids.

One of my favorite episodes that they’ve done is Episode #30 Bat-Bombs, Pigeon-Guided Missiles & More. This episode was about various military projects during World War 2 and how they turned out. It was quite interesting but also very strange that these projects almost took flight (pun intended). I heartily recommend the show and feel it would add something new and delightful to your day.

Haka Hadoween!

Haka Hadoween!

Haka Hadoween everybody! When one of the kids was little, they couldn’t say “Happy Halloween” correctly and it came out “Haka Hadoween.” From then on, we say it at least a hundred times every October and it brings us joy every time.

We survived it. I say “survived,” not as a play on Halloween themes, but because a couple of the kids were struggling with colds leading up to the day which is never fun. Additionally, Boy Wonder had major ostomy bag issues during the two nights before October 31st, resulting in sheets needing to be washed, bags needing to be changed and sleep being lost. In spite of all this and the normal stressors of homeschooling life, Halloween went off great.

The three younger ones all had homemade costumes completed in time, by mom and they looked amazing. They each had a clear idea of what they wanted to be and it was neat to hear their choices. Boy Wonder wanted to be Green Arrow, likely because he had this cool bow and arrow set that lit up with green LED lights and it looked great walking around the neighborhood in the dark. G-man wanted to be a pumpkin for some reason and if you look at him, he really is built to be a pumpkin. Lil Bit wanted to be a bat. Not the superhero, Batgirl, but the flying rodent. Also not sure the reasoning behind it, we were just glad she didn’t want to do a princess again. Peanut went her own way and bought a raccoon onesie from the store and wore that while trick-or-treating with friends.

This was the first year that she went with friends instead of staying with the family. I guess she has finally reached that age where that is going to be the norm. It made us a little sad but we remember being her age and how fun that was so we let it happen. The rest of us stopped by a trunk-or-treat that was down the street but after standing in line for five minutes, we bailed and hit the streets instead.

That was probably the last time we will even consider a trunk-or-treat as they are just lame. I mean, I don’t want the kids doing the whole cattle line, shuffling forward a few feet at a time, in this quest for precious candy. By the end of the night, they had done much better by knocking on doors and they got the wonderful experiences and memories that come with that. Plus, I know all the people behind those doors that answered the ringing doorbell were overjoyed that kids were keeping the tradition alive. We saw more kids and families walking the neighborhood this year than we have seen in years and that was awesome. So until next year, Haka Hadoween!

Monkeys With Money & Guns

Monkeys With Money & Guns

Earlier today, I was struck by this Tom Waits quote that I stumbled across.

[su_quote]We are buried beneath the weight of information, which is being confused with knowledge; quantity is being confused with abundance and wealth with happiness. We are monkeys with money and guns.[/su_quote]

Tom Waits is an acclaimed musician, songwriter, and actor and this quote offers an interesting insight into life in our modern age. When I read it, I think about what our responsibilities are as parents. It is part of our job as parents to teach our kids the value of knowledge, of sifting through the avalanche of information that the internet gives them access to. in order to find what matters. We need to teach them the critical thinking skills to help them to not be so easily swayed by “news” and social media.

By doing this, our children will be much more valuable to society for they will stand out among their peers. They will see the truth for what it is. They will see the value in experiences and relationships over material possessions. They won’t just be monkeys with money and guns.

Work at the Gift

Work at the Gift

This is a series of pictures that were taken by mom of Peanut doing what she loves. Art has come naturally to her as neither of us as her parentals have this talent. But, along with the gift has come the desire to work at it. She is ALWAYS drawing, painting, creating. We often have to tell her to stop just so she can get some other school work in. Will this lead to a future career one day? I don’t know and I don’t think it really matters. What matters is that she is working hard at developing her skills and that can apply to any future career. In the meantime, we are just going to appreciate the gift that she is to us.

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